FAQs of Scholarly Output Reporting (SOP)

I can find my article in Web of Science, but the library staff told me that my article is not included in SCI. Why?

Web of Science is an integrated database platform, which includes SCI, CPCI, MEDLINE, etc. Scholarly output reports are provided by the library to prove that the articles are included in the SCI database. Therefore, when searching in Web of Science, one should limit the searching within SCI under Web of Science Core Collection. If not, an article included in databases (such as MEDLINE) other than SCI will be retrieved and one may mistakenly consider the article is included in SCI.

Please take the following steps (as illustrated) to make sure an article is included in SCI: 

Limit the searching to start the search. If the article is retrieved, it means the article is included in SCI. If you need to know whether the article is included in the SSCI database, then the next step is to check the SSCI database.

Will all the published articles provided by the author be listed in the SOP?

The report provided by library is to prove that the articles are included or cited in databases such as SCI, EI.  Only when the article is included in databases such as SCI, EI can the article be listed in the scholarly output report provided by the library. If the article is not included in databases such as SCI, EI, the article can not be listed in the SOP.

My article has just been received or published by a journal, which is also the source journal of SCI, but the article is not yet included in SCI. Will the article be listed in the SOP?

The SCI database is updated regularly, and the newly received articles or the latest published articles may not be retrieved by the SCI database before it is updated. If the article cannot be retrieved in the SCI database, it can not be listed in the SOP. Only when the SCI database is updated and the article is retrieved in the SCI database can the article be listed in the report.

Why is the number of citations in the report different from what I’ve found?

The number of citations in the report refers to the times cited in the SCI database of Web of Science Core Collection, not the times cited in the entire platform of Web of Science, nor the times cited you got by using Google, Baidu and other search platforms.

How to view the number of citations in SCI for an article?

Take the article "Comprehensive study of the metal-insulator transition in pulsed laser deposited epitaxial VO2" as an example. The result shows the number of citations is 57 by searching in Web of Science, as shown below:

Then why does the number become smaller when clicking on the number of cited times? This is because Web of Science Core Collection not only includes SCI, but also includes other databases such as ESCI, CPCI. The number 57 is the times cited for the whole Web of Science Core Collection, while 55 is the times cited in the SCI database. On the page of citing articles, click on "View Additional Times Cited Counts", you can find that only 55 records are from SCI\SSCI\A&HCI, that is, the total times cited in SCI is 55, as shown below:

What is JCR?

JCR (Journal Citation Reports) is the journal citation report published annually by Clarivate (formerly Thomson Reuters). JCR is a unique evaluation tool for multidisciplinary journals. By analyzing citation references, it measures research influence and impact at the journal and category levels, and shows the relationship between citing and cited journals. JCR has two versions: Science Edition and Social Sciences Edition. JCR-Science covers more than 8500 journals and includes 176 disciplines. JCR-Social Science covers more than 3000 journals and includes 56 disciplines. In JCR, the citing and cited times of the journal are counted and calculated, and Impact Factor and other indicators are defined for each journal. The two most popular indicators for JCR are impact factor and JCR Ranking.

Impact factor (IF): Impact factor is a quantitative index to indicate impact of a journal. The impact factor of a journal refers to the current year average cited times of the articles published in that journal during the previous two years.

The impact factor = current year cited times of the articles published in the journal during the previous two years / the total number of the articles published in the journal during the previous two years.

JCR Ranking: It is difficult to evaluate journals for different disciplines, so to differentiate impact of journals for different disciplines, Clarivate divides SCI and SSCI journals into 4 ranks evenly for each discipline annually, namely Q1, Q2, Q3 and Q4 according to the impact factor of the journal in the current year. Q1> Q2> Q3> Q4 (Q: Quartile in category).

For more information, please refer to https://clarivate.com/products/journal-citation-reports/

How to find the impact factor and JCR ranking for a journal?

Open the library homepage, find Collections, then find Databases, then find JCR to access the database. Take the journal "ACS NANO" as an example, copy and paste the journal title of "ACS NANO" in the search box. After the system identifies the journal, click on it to enter the result page, and the impact factor and ranking for all publishing years can be viewed, as shown below:

What is the difference of JCR ranking: Q1*, Q1①, and Q1 in the SOP?

The symbols of * and ① in the report are corresponded to the explanatory notes following the tables to explain some unusual situations.

* generally means that there is no data for current year in JCR, so data for the previous year or the next year is provided for reference. For example, in a report Q1* corresponds to the note: "This is the JCR data for 2016 because data for 2017 is not available yet”, which means that the article is published in a journal in 2017, but the JCR database has not released the data for 2017; therefore, JCR Ranking of 2016 is used for reference. If the JCR Ranking of 2016 is Q1, the ranking for this article is Q1*. * is only an exploratory symbol of a particular situation.

①,②... generally mean that in JCR, the journal belongs to different ranks for different disciplines, and this is the top ranking. For example, in a report Q1① corresponds to the note: "The journal in which the article is published belongs to Q1 for the fields of CHEMISTRY and PHYSICAL, and Q2 for the fields of NANOSCIENCE & NANOTECHNOLOGY", meaning the journal belongs to different ranks for different disciplines (Q1 for CHEMISTRY and PHYSICAL, Q2 for NANOSCIENCE & NANOTECHNOLOGY), so in the table we will choose the higher ranking of Q1 and indicate with ①.  ① is only an exploratory symbol of a particular situation.